In the adjoining figure we can see how the door leaf and the frame make up the classic nut-cracker. The door acts as a lever so that the force exerted in trapping a finger is up to 80 times greater than the force that we use to close the door.

The FLEXOOR System protects by means of two simultaneous actions: separating and balancing.

1) SEPARATING

The FLEXOOR System protects in case of trapping by moving the door leaf away from the frame as the door is closing. You can see this by moving the mouse arrow over the adjoining figure. Clicking over the figure will launch a litle QuickTime video.

2) BALANCING

The FLEXOOR System also protects by compensating the force exerted on trapping on the lower part of the door. The diagram shows that weight P exerts in the upper hinge a force F which tends to separate the door leaf from the frame, and a force F’ in the lower hinge which tends to bring the door leaf closer to the frame. The hinges compensate forces F and F’. The upper hinge (type A) tends to bring the door leaf closer to the frame, and the lower hinge (type B) tends to separate it. The trapping force in the lower zone is therefore smaller. Most trapping cases that children undergo happen in this lower zone.

DOOR PROTECTION

By means of these actions, (separating and balancing) the FLEXOOR System limits the forces that the door undergoes, thus preventing door misalignments and deformations.

The graphic represents the trapping force that undergoes an object of approximately 9 mm in diameter when introduced in the door jam of a door that is hinged with the FLEXOOR System. The vertical axis indicates the height to which the trapping takes place and the horizontal axis indicates the force that is exerted on the object. The graphic indicates the general tendency and can vary from one door to another according to the width and weight of the door leaf.

Following the FLEXOOR curve downwards, we see that it stop increasing in the middle area. That change of tendency is due to the action of the lower hinges (type B), which push the door leaf instead of pulling it (balancing action). The trapping force in the lower zone is therefore smaller. Most trapping cases that children undergo happen in this lower zone.